Author Archive


MSI Webinar – Climate Survey

      Posted on: Jan 15th, 2021 at 3:21 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Barbara Kahn (2020). 2019 Academic Marketing Climate Survey: Motivation, Results, and Recommendations. Presented at the MSI Lunch series webinar.

INFORMATION ON CLIMATE SURVEY HERE: http://www.jeffgalak.com/climatesurvey

Dartmouth – Tuck School of Business (2020)

      Posted on: Dec 18th, 2020 at 12:28 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2020) Identifying the Temporal Profiles of Hedonic Decline. Invited talk at Dartmouth – Tuck School of Business.

University of Alberta, Alberta School of Business (2020)

      Posted on: Oct 19th, 2020 at 1:58 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2020) Identifying the Temporal Profiles of Hedonic Decline. Invited talk at University of Alberta, Alberta School of Business.

Columbia GSB 2020

      Posted on: Oct 19th, 2020 at 1:45 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2020) Identifying the Temporal Profiles of Hedonic Decline. Invited talk at Columbia GSB

2020 – Marketing Science Institute Scholar

      Posted on: Aug 31st, 2020 at 7:23 pm ; No Comments

2020 – Marketing Science Institute Scholar

2020 – Finalist for George Leland Bach Award for MBA Teaching Excellence

      Posted on: May 22nd, 2020 at 10:14 am ; No Comments

2020 – Finalist for George Leland Bach Award for MBA Teaching Excellence

2019 Academic Marketing Climate Survey

      Posted on: Mar 19th, 2020 at 2:08 pm ; No Comments

2019 Academic Marketing Climate Survey

 

SCP 2020

      Posted on: Mar 7th, 2020 at 2:24 pm ; No Comments

Redden, Joseph P., Jeff Galak, Kameko Halfmann, William Hedgcock (2020). A Top-Down Neural Mechanism for Satiation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Consumer Psychology, Huntungton Beach, CA.

The Thought that Counts is the One We Ignore:

      Posted on: Jan 8th, 2020 at 7:00 am ; No Comments

Givi, Julian, Jeff Galak, and Christopher Y. Olivola, “The Thought That Counts Is the One We Ignore How Givers Overestimate the Importance of Relative Gift Value” forthcoming at the Journal of Business Research.

The “Future Is Now”

      Posted on: Jun 23rd, 2019 at 10:00 am ; No Comments

Givi, Julian and Jeff Galak (2019), “The “future is now” bias: Anchoring and (insufficient) adjustment when predicting the future from the present”  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. 84, 1-18. [SSRN] [Data and Materials] [Paper]

2019 – Finalist for George Leland Bach Award for MBA Teaching Excellence

      Posted on: May 22nd, 2019 at 3:14 pm ; No Comments

2019 – Finalist for George Leland Bach Award for MBA Teaching Excellence

Keeping the Joneses from getting ahead in the first place: Envy’s influence on gift giving behavior

      Posted on: Apr 28th, 2019 at 1:10 am ; No Comments

Givi, Julian and Jeff Galak (2019). “Keeping the Joneses from getting ahead in the first place: Envy’s influence on gift giving behavior”  Journal of Business Research, 101 (August), 375-388. [SSRN] [Paper] [Data and Materials]

Selfish Prosocial Behavior: Gift-Giving to Feel Unique

      Posted on: Apr 25th, 2019 at 8:34 am ; No Comments

Givi, Julian and Jeff Galak, “Selfish prosocial behavior: Gift-giving to feel unique.” Journal of the Association for Consumer Research5(1), 34-43. [SSRN] [Data and Materials] [Paper]

Emory 2019

      Posted on: Mar 1st, 2019 at 6:59 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2019), “(Progress In) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at Emory – Goizueta School of Business.

Compensate a little, but punish a lot: Asymmetric routes to restoring justice

      Posted on: Dec 30th, 2018 at 3:11 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Rosalind Chow (2019). Compensate a little, but punish a lot: Asymmetric routes to restoring justice, PLOS ONE, 14(1), e0210676. [Data and Materials][Paper]

Partisan Acceptance of Policy, but Not Personal Lies

      Posted on: Oct 2nd, 2018 at 12:57 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Clayton R. Critcher (2018). Partisan Acceptance of Policy, but Not Personal Lies. [Data and Materials]

BDRM 2018 – Compensate a little, but punish a lot: Asymmetric routes to restoring justice

      Posted on: Jun 10th, 2018 at 6:30 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Rosalind Chow (2018). Compensate a little, but punish a lot: Asymmetric routes to restoring justice. Paper presented at the Behavioral Decision  Research in Marketing conference in Boston, MA.

MSI 2018

      Posted on: May 15th, 2018 at 11:01 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2018). Stopping “Hedonic Decline” of Once-Loved Products. MSI Behavioral Insights Conference 2018, Duke University.

Wharton 2018

      Posted on: May 4th, 2018 at 2:05 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2018), “(Progress In) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at Wharton Business School.

The Thought that Counts is the One We Ignore: How Givers Overestimate the Importance of Relative Gift Quality

      Posted on: May 3rd, 2018 at 6:36 pm ; No Comments

Givi, Juilan, Jeff Galak, and Chris Olivola (2018). The Thought that Counts is the One We Ignore: How Givers Overestimate the Importance of Relative Gift Quality. [Data and Materials]

Poets and Quants

      Posted on: Apr 24th, 2018 at 10:55 am ; No Comments

2018 – Poets and Quants Best 40 Under 40 Professors

SPSP Precon – Compensate a Little, but Punish a Lot: Asymmetric Routes to Restoring Justice

      Posted on: Mar 1st, 2018 at 9:44 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Rosalind Chow (2018). ” Compensate a Little, but Punish a Lot: Asymmetric Routes to Restoring Justice” presented at the JDM Pre-conference for the Annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology

2018 – Society for Consumer Psychology Early Career Contribution Award

      Posted on: Feb 22nd, 2018 at 10:52 am ; No Comments

2018 – Society for Consumer Psychology Early Career Contribution Award [Speech Text]

ARP: The Properties and Antecedents of Hedonic Decline

      Posted on: Nov 25th, 2017 at 2:13 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff & Joseph P. Redden (2018). The Properties and Antecedents of Hedonic Decline. Annual Review of Psychology 69  (6), 1-25. [Paper]

2017 ACR 2

      Posted on: Oct 30th, 2017 at 10:58 am ; No Comments

Givi, Julian and Jeff Galak (2017). “Sentimental Value and Gift Giving: A Giver-Recipient Mismatch” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, Sand Diego, CA.

2017 ACR 1

      Posted on: Oct 30th, 2017 at 10:58 am ; No Comments

Givi, Julian, Jeff Galak and Christopher Olivola (2017). “Two’s Company, Three’s a Crowd: Givers’ Oversensitivity to Other Givers’ Gifts” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, Sand Diego, CA.

2017 – Association for Consumer Research Early Career Award

      Posted on: Oct 28th, 2017 at 3:13 pm ; No Comments

2017 – Association for Consumer Research Early Career Award

Sentimental Gifts Are Seldom Given: Gift Recipients Prefer Sentimentally Valuable Gifts, but Are Unlikely to Receive Them

      Posted on: Oct 19th, 2017 at 3:16 pm ; No Comments

Givi, Julian and Jeff Galak (2017). Sentimental value and gift giving: Givers’ fears of getting it wrong prevents them from getting it right. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 27 (4), 473-479. [Paper] [Data and Materials]

SDMS 2017

      Posted on: May 26th, 2017 at 10:10 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Martijn J. van den Assem, Dennie Vandolser, Tong Wang (2017). “Near Hits’ Influence on Risk Taking.” Paper presented at the Summer Decision Making Symposium in Philadelphia, PA.

SJDM 2016

      Posted on: Feb 25th, 2017 at 2:30 pm ; No Comments

Yang, Yang, Yangjie Gu and Jeff Galak. (2016) “When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How the Mere Possibility of a Negative Experience Influences Hedonic Adaptation.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, Boston, MA.

Rejecting a Bad Option Feels like Choosing a Good One

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2017 at 6:22 am ; No Comments

Perfecto, Hannah, Jeff Galak, Leif D. Nelson and Joseph P. Simmons (2017). “Rejecting a Bad Option Feels like Choosing a Good One”. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 113 (5), 659-670 [Paper] [Data and Materials]

Yale 2016

      Posted on: Aug 24th, 2016 at 5:16 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2016), “(The Beginnings of) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at Yale School of Management.

When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How the Mere Possibility of a Negative Experience Influences Hedonic Adaptation

      Posted on: Aug 15th, 2016 at 12:49 pm ; No Comments

Yang, Yang, Yangjie Gu and Jeff Galak (2016). “When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How the Mere Possibility of a Negative Experience Influences Hedonic Adaptation”  Journal of Consumer Research, 43 (5), 747-768. [Paper]

2016 – Finalist for George Leland Bach Award for MBA Teaching Excellence

      Posted on: Jun 24th, 2016 at 10:13 am ; No Comments

2016 – Finalist for George Leland Bach Award for MBA Teaching Excellence

LBS 2016

      Posted on: Jun 24th, 2016 at 10:10 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2016), “(The Beginnings of) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at London Business School.

Choice Symposium – When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How the Mere Possibility of a Negative Experience Influences Hedonic Adaptation

      Posted on: Jun 24th, 2016 at 10:09 am ; No Comments

Yang, Yang, Yangjie Gu and Jeff Galak. (2016) “When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How the Mere Possibility of a Negative Experience Influences Hedonic Adaptation.” Paper presented at the 2016 Invitational Choice Symposium in Banff, Canada.

Why Certain Gifts Are Great to Give But Not to Get: A Framework for Understanding Errors in Gift Giving

      Posted on: Jun 7th, 2016 at 11:22 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Julian Givi & Elanor F. Williams (2016). Why Certain Gifts Are Great to Give But Not to Get: A Framework for Understanding Errors in Gift Giving. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 25(6), 380-385 [Paper].

2016 Choice Symposium – When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How Favorable Uncertainty Resolution Slows Hedonic Adaptation

      Posted on: May 19th, 2016 at 11:56 am ; No Comments

Yang, Yang, Yangjie Gu, & Jeff Galak (2016). When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How Favorable Uncertainty Resolution Slows Hedonic Adaptation. Paper presented at the 2016 Choice Symposium in Banff, Canada.

Trickle-down preferences: Preferential conformity to high status peers in fashion choices

      Posted on: Mar 31st, 2016 at 2:06 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Kurt Gray, Igor Elbert, Nina Strohminger (2016). Trickle-down preferences: Preferential conformity to high status peers in fashion choices. PLoS ONE 11(5): e0153448. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0153448 [Paper]

The Influence of Contextual Cues in Judgment Formation: An Ecologically Valid Test

      Posted on: Mar 30th, 2016 at 11:49 am ; No Comments

Jacoby, Jack and Jeff Galak (2016). The Influence of Contextual Cues in Judgment Formation: An Ecologically Valid Test. PLoS ONE 11(4): e0154383. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0154383 [Paper]

When Gift Giving is Selfish: A Motivation to be Unique – SJDM

      Posted on: Dec 10th, 2015 at 9:52 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff & Julian Givi (2015). “When Gift Giving is Selfish: A Motivation to be Unique”. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making in Chicago, IL.

Sentimental Value and Its Influence on Hedonic Adaptation

      Posted on: Aug 10th, 2015 at 9:12 am ; No Comments

Yang, Yang, and Jeff Galak (2015), “Sentimental Value and Its Influence on Hedonic Adaptation,”  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 109 (5), 767-790 [Paper] [SSRN].

Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.

      Posted on: Aug 5th, 2015 at 9:19 am ; No Comments

Open Science Collaboration. (2015).  Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.  Science, 349, 943 [Paper]

The Open Science Collaboration is a large group of scientists working together to assess the replicatilability of psychological science. More information here.

SDMS 2015 Variations on Injustice: Explicit, Emotional, and Behavioral Responses to When Good (Bad) Things Happen to Bad (Good) People

      Posted on: Jun 15th, 2015 at 1:15 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Rosalind Chow (2015). “Variations on Injustice: Explicit, Emotional, and Behavioral Responses to When Good (Bad) Things Happen to Bad (Good) People” Paper presented at the Summer Decision Making Symposium, Montreal, Canada.

Gu, Yangjie

      Posted on: Jun 15th, 2015 at 12:56 pm ; No Comments

Duke – 214

      Posted on: Nov 21st, 2014 at 12:29 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2014), “(The Beginnings of) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at Fuqua School of Business, Duke University.

Cornell – 2014

      Posted on: Oct 9th, 2014 at 10:30 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2014), “(The Beginnings of) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at Johnson School of Business, Cornell University.

CBDR – 2014

      Posted on: Sep 18th, 2014 at 1:33 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2014), “(The Beginnings of) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at CBDR Seminar – CMU.

SDMS 2014

      Posted on: May 17th, 2014 at 6:20 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2014), “Sentimental Value” Research presented at the Summer Decision Making Symposium, Washington DC.

WSJ 2014

      Posted on: May 17th, 2014 at 6:18 pm ; No Comments

Nice quote in the Wall Street Journal.

Men’s Health

      Posted on: Apr 4th, 2014 at 11:20 am ; No Comments

Nice article I did an interview for at Men’s Health Magazine about Binge Consumption of TV.

SCP 2014 – Love it Longer

      Posted on: Mar 12th, 2014 at 9:09 am ; No Comments

Yang, Yang & Jeff Galak (2014). “Love it Longer: Sentimental Value Slows Hedonic Adaptation.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Consumer Psychology, Miami, FL.

Quoted in the Guardian

      Posted on: Feb 15th, 2014 at 10:13 am ; No Comments

Nice quote in the Guardian today: CVS stops selling cigarettes. Will competitors follow?

Georgetown

      Posted on: Jan 31st, 2014 at 3:19 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2013), “The Beginnings of) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at McDonough School of Business – Georgetown University

How Perceptions of Temporal Distance Influence Satiation

      Posted on: Jan 4th, 2014 at 1:25 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Joseph Redden, Yang Yang, and Ellie Kyung (2014), “How Perceptions of Temporal Distance Influence Satiation”. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology,52, 118-123. [Paper] [SSRN]

DocSIG Top 50 (2009-2013)

      Posted on: Dec 9th, 2013 at 10:43 am ; No Comments

2013 – American Marketing Association: DocSIG Top 50 Marketing Faculty List (based on productivity in 2009-2013)

UMinessota

      Posted on: Oct 30th, 2013 at 11:58 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2013), “The Beginnings of) Understanding Sentimental Value”, Invited talk at Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota.

SUNY Stony Brook

      Posted on: Jun 17th, 2013 at 9:19 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2013), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY.

The Neural Correlates of Satiation

      Posted on: Jun 17th, 2013 at 9:12 am ; No Comments

Hedgcock, William, Joseph Redden, and Jeff Galak, “The Neural Correlates of Satiation”

      Posted on: Jun 17th, 2013 at 8:53 am ; No Comments

2013 –  Finalist for 2012 Paul E. Green Award at the Journal of Marketing Research for: Stephen, Andrew T., and Jeff Galak (2012), “The effects of Traditional and Social Earned Media on Sales: An Application to a Microlending Marketplace,” Journal of Marketing Research, 49, 624-639.

Slow Down! Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Avoidable Satiation

      Posted on: Mar 4th, 2013 at 6:14 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2013), “Slow Down! Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Avoidable Satiation”,Journal of Consumer Research, 39 (5), 993-1009. [Paper] [SSRN]

The Subjective Sense of Feeling Satiated

      Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2013 at 11:47 am ; No Comments

Redden, Joseph and Jeff Galak (2013), “The Subjective Sense of Feeling Satiated” forthcoming Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 142 (1), 209-217 [SSRN] [Paper]

2013 – Selected to be part of MSI Young Scholar Conference

      Posted on: Jan 13th, 2013 at 1:12 pm ; No Comments

2013 – Selected to be part of MSI Young Scholar Conference

Booth – Satiatin

      Posted on: Oct 31st, 2012 at 9:29 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2012), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at the University of Chicago, Booth School of Business.

Media coverage of income inequality paper

      Posted on: Oct 30th, 2012 at 5:37 pm ; No Comments

My paper with Rosalind Chow got some nice media coverage on the Pacific Standard website. See it here.

ACR 2012 – When Good Things Come to an End: Mispredicting Motivation for Unavailable Goods

      Posted on: Oct 9th, 2012 at 2:13 pm ; No Comments

Yang, Yang, Carey Morewedge, & Jeff Galak (2012). “When Good Things Come to an End: Mispredicting Motivation for Unavailable Goods.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, Vancouver, Canada.

Runner up JCR Paper of the Year 2009

      Posted on: Oct 9th, 2012 at 2:03 pm ; No Comments

2012 – Runner up JCR Paper of the Year 2009 for: Nelson, Leif D., Tom Meyvis, and Jeff Galak (2009),   “Enhancing the Television Viewing Experience through Commercial Interruptions,” Journal of Consumer Research, 36 (August), 160-172.

An Open, Large-Scale, Collaborative Effort to Estimate the Reproducibility of Psychological Science

      Posted on: Sep 5th, 2012 at 12:37 pm ; No Comments

Open Science Collaboration (2012), “An Open, Large-Scale, Collaborative Effort to Estimate the Reproducibility of Psychological Science”, Perspectives on Psychological Science7, 652-655. [SSRN]

The Open Science Collaboration is a large group of scientists working together to assess the replicatilability of psychological science. More information here.

A nice comment on our Psi article in JPSP.

      Posted on: Aug 31st, 2012 at 1:43 pm ; No Comments

Steven Novella over at Neurologicablog has a nice discussion of our Psi article here.

Slow Down news stories

      Posted on: Aug 31st, 2012 at 9:54 am ; No Comments

My paper with Justin and George in JCR has gotten a little bit of media attention. Here are the links:

– Want To Have Your Cake And Enjoy It, Too? in Prevention.
– Don’t Burn Out in Science Codex
– Don’t burn out: Enjoy your favorite products more by consuming them less frequently in Phys.org

Always nice to get some attention!

Berkeley Haas

      Posted on: Aug 28th, 2012 at 8:04 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2012), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at UC Berkeley, Haas School of Business, Berkeley, CA.

APA 2012 – The Subjective Sense of Feeling Satiated

      Posted on: Aug 5th, 2012 at 4:32 pm ; No Comments

Redden, Joseph & Jeff Galak (2012), “The Subjective Sense of Feeling Satiated.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, Orlando, FL.

Morewedge, Carey K.

      Posted on: Jul 4th, 2012 at 5:19 pm ; No Comments

When Good Things Come to an End: Mispredicting the Desire for Goods to Which Consumers Lose Access

      Posted on: Jul 4th, 2012 at 5:08 pm ; No Comments

Yang, Yang, Carey Morewedge, & Jeff Galak, “When Good Things Come to an End: The Trajectory of Desire for Consummatory Stimuli When Access is Lost.”

LeBoeuf, Robyn A.

      Posted on: Jul 4th, 2012 at 5:01 pm ; No Comments

Chow, Rosalind

      Posted on: Jul 4th, 2012 at 4:59 pm ; No Comments

Yang, Yang

      Posted on: Jul 4th, 2012 at 4:57 pm ; No Comments

Correcting the Past: Failures to Replicate Psi

      Posted on: Jun 19th, 2012 at 5:48 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Robyn A. LeBoeuf, Leif D. Nelson, & Joseph P. Simmons (2012), “Correcting the Past: Failures to Replicate Psi”, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 103(6), 933-948[SSRN] [Paper] [Data]

Paper originally titled  “A Replication of the Procedures from Bem (2010, Study 8 ) and a Failure to Replicate the Same Results.” can still be found here: SSRN

MARC 2012

      Posted on: May 14th, 2012 at 10:21 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2012), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at MARC Conference, Pittsburgh PA.

WSJ Week in Ideas

      Posted on: May 12th, 2012 at 2:00 pm ; No Comments

Justin found this nice little write up of our paper on the WSJ website.

See here.

The effect of inequality frames on redistributive income policy support

      Posted on: Apr 24th, 2012 at 6:27 pm ; No Comments

Chow, Rosalind & Jeff  Galak(2012), “The effect of inequality frames on redistributive income policy support”, Psychological Science. [SSRN] [Paper]

The Effects of Traditional and Social Earned Media on Sales: A Study of a Microlending Marketplace

      Posted on: Mar 30th, 2012 at 5:59 am ; No Comments

Stephen, Andrew T., and Jeff Galak (2012). “The effects of Traditional and Social Earned Media on Sales: An Application to a Microlending Marketplace,” forthcoming at  Journal of Marketing Research, 49, 624-639.  [Paper] [SSRN]

Finalist for 2012 Paul E. Green Award

Predicting the longevity of music

      Posted on: Mar 8th, 2012 at 6:39 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff Karim Kassam, and Joseph Redden, “Predicting the longevity of music”

UCSD Psych

      Posted on: Mar 8th, 2012 at 6:36 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2012), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at UCSD Psychology, La Jolla, CA.

Feels Far or Near – SCP 2012

      Posted on: Feb 20th, 2012 at 2:38 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Joseph Redden, Yang Yang, and Ellie Kyung (2012), “Feels Far or Near? How Subjective Perception of When One Last Consumed Influences Satiation,” Paper presented at the Society for Consumer Psychology, Las Vegas, NV.

SPSP 2012 – The Effect of Decision Ease and Option Valence on Preference Projection

      Posted on: Jan 29th, 2012 at 7:19 pm ; No Comments

Simmons, Joseph P., Leif D. Nelson, and Jeff Galak (2012), “The Effect of Decision Ease and Option Valence on Preference Projection”, Paper presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference, San Diego, CA.

Pittsburgh Business Times

      Posted on: Dec 31st, 2011 at 4:19 pm ; No Comments

Anya Litvak over at the Pittsburgh Business Times wrote an article about one of my lessons in my Marketing 1 class (on pricing). If only I had a subscription and could actually read the article! There’s a reasonable photo included too.

 

Link here.

Newsday

      Posted on: Nov 27th, 2011 at 10:52 pm ; No Comments

So my hometown (sort of) newspaper apparently picked up my paper with Tom a while ago. Who knew! Story here.

Stanford

      Posted on: Nov 27th, 2011 at 10:52 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2011), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at Stanford GSB, Palo Alto, CA.

Feels Far or Near – JDM 2011

      Posted on: Nov 22nd, 2011 at 10:53 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Joseph Redden, Yang Yang, and Ellie Kyung (2011), “Feels Far or Near? How Subjective Perception of When One Last Consumed Influences Satiation,” Paper presented at the Society for Judgment and Decision Making Conference, Seattle, WA.

Harvard

      Posted on: Oct 24th, 2011 at 7:52 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2011), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at Harvard Psychology, Cambridge, MA.

Feels Far or Near – ACR 2011

      Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011 at 7:53 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Joseph Redden, Yang Yang, and Ellie Kyung (2011), “Feels Far or Near? How Subjective Perception of When One Last Consumed Influences Satiation,” Paper presented at the Association for Consumer Research Conference, St. Louis, MO.

Covered by Scientific American

      Posted on: Aug 2nd, 2011 at 12:14 pm ; No Comments

How cool is this: The Power of Negative Thought. My most esoteric paper gets coverage in a popular science magazine!

Apparently I’m an Expert on Weddings

      Posted on: Jul 27th, 2011 at 11:12 am ; No Comments

According to Smartmoney and the Pittsburgh Tribune, I’m now an expert on weddings (and also an expert on being terribly mis-quoted). Basically, my contention is that the reason we’re seeing more couples asking for charitable contributions as wedding gifts in lieu of traditional wedding registries is that couples are getting married at a considerably older age (up from around 22 years old to 27 years old since 1950) and with considerably more money (especially women…up from 8k/year income to about 22k per year since 1950). Instead of needing yet another set of dishes that will only serve to clutter up their homes, couples are now asking their guests to donate to charities.

Summer Decision Making Conference – Feels Far or Near? How Subjective Perception of When One Last Consumed Influences Satiation

      Posted on: Jun 14th, 2011 at 3:05 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Joseph Redden, Yang Yang, and Ellie Kyung (2011), “Feels Far or Near? How Subjective Perception of When One Last Consumed Influences Satiation,” Paper presented at the Summer Decision Making Symposium, Las Vegas Nevada.

Micro-Finance Decision Making: A Field Study of Prosocial Lending

      Posted on: Jun 13th, 2011 at 6:20 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Deborah Small, and Andrew Stephen (2011), “Micro-Finance Decision Making: A Field Study of Prosocial Lending,”   Journal of Marketing Research, 48, S130-S137. [SSRN] [Paper]

2011 – Junior Faculty Giving Chair

      Posted on: May 25th, 2011 at 10:35 am ; No Comments

2011 – Junior Faculty Giving Chair

HKUST

      Posted on: May 12th, 2011 at 7:49 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2011), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China.

Wharton Talk

      Posted on: May 12th, 2011 at 7:48 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2011), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at the Wharton School of Business (Decision Processes Seminar), University of Pennsylvania, Philladelpha, PA

SCP 2011 – Processing Fluency and Satiation

      Posted on: Mar 1st, 2011 at 4:09 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, and Joseph Redden (2011), “Processing Fluency and Satiation”, Paper  presented at the annual conference for the Society of Consumer Psychology, Atlanta, GA.

UPitt Talk – Malleability of Satiation

      Posted on: Mar 1st, 2011 at 12:11 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2011), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at the Katz School of Business, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Lots of media coverage for the JEP:G paper with Tom

      Posted on: Feb 23rd, 2011 at 9:49 pm ; No Comments

The APA put out a press release about the JEP:G paper with Tom and it wound up getting picked up quite a bit!

 

1. Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them

U.S. News & World Report – ‎February 10, 2011

This could be an adaptive reaction, said the researchers in a news release from the American Psychological Association. People may attempt to maintain their …

 

2. Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them

Bloomberg BusinessWeek – February 11, 2011

This could be an adaptive reaction, said the researchers in a news release from the American Psychological Association. People may attempt to maintain their …

3. The Worst Is Yet to Come

Daily Rx – February 16, 2011
New research shows that bad things can seem worse if people know that they will experience them again. Conversely, people remember bad experiences as being less unpleasant or painful if they believe it will not happen to them again.

4. The past hurts worse when it will return

Psychology Today – February 15, 2011

A study by Jeff Galak and Tom Meyvis in the February, 2011 issue of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General suggests that it is useful to remember …

5. Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them | Health32.Com

Health32.com – February 11, 2011

Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them.— People are more likely to recall an unpleasant experience as …

 

6. Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them

Mesothelioma Online – February 13, 2011

Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them — People are more.

7. Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them | Diet Care

Dietcare.net – February 13, 2011

People are more likely to recall an unpleasant experience as being less painful or annoying if they believe it is.

 

8. Science Today News

Science Today – February 11, 2011

Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them. People are more likely to recall an unpleasant experience as being less painful or annoying if they. …

9. Clinical Connection – Health News

Clinical Connection – February 12, 2011

Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them. But recollections are less painful if you think the worst is over, …

10. Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have to Live Through Them Again

Planmybabyreviews.com – February 10, 2011

Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have to Live Through Them Again Prospect of repeating an experience can change how one remembers it, research says. …

 

11. Bad Times May Seem Worse If You Expect to Repeat Them

World News.com – February 10, 2011

Bad things seem even worse if people expect them to happen again soon …

12. Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have to Live Through Them Again

The Mental Health Social Worker – February 9, 2011

When people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful or annoying than when they expect them to happen again, pointing to the power of expectation to help people brace for the worst, according to studies published by the American Psychological Association.

13. Study: Bad Things Are Worse the Second Time Around

Village Voice – February 8, 2011

This is backed up by research published from the American Psychological Association. The studies exposed people to irritating things, like vacuum cleaner …

 

14. Internal corruption is worse than external terrorism | India News …

India News – February 8, 2011

Bad things seem worse if you live them again – Bad or annoying events seem much worse if people have to go through them again. …

 

15. Science Centric | News | Bad things seem even worse if people have …

Science Centric – February 8, 2011

When people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful or annoying than when they expect them to happen again, …

16. Disaster Strikes Article Directory » Bad things seem even worse if …

Disasterstrikes.org – February 9, 2011

Bad things seem even worse if people expect them to happen again soon

17. Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have To Live Through Them …

Thenewslist.com – February 8, 2011

When people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful or annoying than when they expect them to happen again, …

18. Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have To Live Through Them …

Neurotalk – February 8, 2011

Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have To Live Through Them Again

 

19. Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have To Live Through Them …

The Star – February 8, 2011

When people think unpleasant events …

20. Bad things seem even worse if people have to live through them …

Niuwsfeiten.be – February 8, 2011

Bad things seem even worse if people have to live through them again.

21. Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have To Live Through Them Again

Medical News Today – ‎February 8, 2011

… pointing to the power of expectation to help people brace for the worst, according to studies published by the American Psychological Association. …

 

22. Why we make bad things seem even worse

Times of India – ‎February 8, 2011

New studies suggest that when people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful or annoying than when they expect them to …

 

23. Repeating bad experience makes it seem worse

Sify – February 8, 2011

Bad or annoying events seem much worse if people have to go through them again. ‘The prospect of repeating an experience can, …

 

24. Bad things seem even worse if people expect them to happen again soon

TopNews – February 8, 2011

New studies suggest that when people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful or annoying than when …

 

25. Bad Things Seem Even Worse if People Have to Live Through Them Again

HealthNewsDigest – February 7, 2011

When people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful or annoying than when they expect them to happen again, pointing to the power of expectation to help people brace for the worst, according to studies published by the American Psychological Association.

 

26. Bad things seem even worse if people have to live through them again

ScienceBlog.com – ‎February 7, 2011

WASHINGTON — When people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful or annoying than when they expect them to happen again, …

 

27. Bad things seem even worse if people have to live through them again

Pysorg – February 7, 2011

When people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful or annoying than when they expect them to happen again, …

28. Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have To Live Through Them

Redorbit.com – February 7, 2011

Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have To Live Through Them Again. Prospect of repeating an experience can …

29. Bad things seem even worse if people have to live through them

Escience News – February 7, 2011

Bad things seem even worse if people have to live through them again.

30. BAD Things Seem Even Worse if People Have to Live Through Them

Topix.com – February 7, 2011

When people think unpleasant events are …

31. Bad things seem even worse if people have to

Lifescience Log – February 7, 2011

Bad things seem even worse if people have to live through them again. When people think unpleasant events are over, they remember them as being less painful …

32. ScienceDaily: Latest Science News

Science Daily – February 8, 2011

Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have to Live Through Them Again ·

33. Repeating bad experience makes it seem worse

Thaindian.com – February 7, 2011

Bad or annoying events seem much worse if people have to go through them again. The prospect of repeating an experience can, in fact, change how people …

34. Repeating bad experience makes it seem worse | Science / Technology

Indiatalkies.com – February 8, 2011

Bad or annoying events seem much worse if people have to go through them again. ‘The prospect of repeating an experience can, in fact, …

35. Repeating bad experience makes it seem worse | China News.Net

Chinanews.net – February 8, 2011

Bad or annoying events seem much worse if people have to go through them again.

36. Repeating bad experience makes it seem worse | Inditop

Inditop.com – February 8, 2011

Bad or annoying events seem much worse if people have to go through them again. ‘The prospect of repeating an experience can, …

 

UPDATE: And one more: FYI Living

According to the APA (and me I guess): Bad Things Seem Even Worse If People Have to Live Through Them Again

      Posted on: Feb 7th, 2011 at 1:23 pm ; No Comments

The APA put out a press release for my upcoming paper with Tom.

Is Variety The Spice of Life? It All Depends On the Rate of Consumption

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2011 at 5:52 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2011), “Is Variety The Spice of Life? It All Depends On the Rate of Consumption.” Judgment and Decision Making, 6 (3), 230-238 [Paper].

WSJ: Pricing and the Holidays

      Posted on: Dec 15th, 2010 at 11:38 am ; No Comments

The WSJ just did a story on pricing strategies that companies use during the holiday season. They asked me on about my thoughts on this. A 20 minute conversions turned into 2 short lines. Oh well, better than nothing.

 

Story here.

Psi

      Posted on: Nov 12th, 2010 at 11:08 am ; 1 Comment

Daryl Bem, one of the most influential and important social psychologists of our time, recently had a paper accepted at the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the premier social psych journal.  This, in and of itself, would not be noteworthy since Dr. Bem has published numerous papers in JPSP. What is noteworthy, however, is that in this paper he conducted 9 experiments that demonstrate the existence of precognition. Yup, that’s right, ESP (or Psi as he calls it). All of the studies are incredibly well run and I have no methodological qualms with them. However, given the nature of the claim, that ESP exists, I felt that it was my duty as a scientist to attempt to replicate his findings. I teamed up with Leif Nelson and we recreated Study 8 (retroactive facilitation of memory). The gist of the study is that studying after an exam helps you on the exam itself. In this case, the exam was a memory task involving 48 common nouns.

In any case, we ran this study online and wrote up the results (tl;dr: we did not replicate his results) in a short paper which can be downloaded on SSRN.

I also put together a public version of the experiment that anyone can try out (and even get their Psi score). You can try out the experiment here.

We’ve also started to get a bit of press for our failed replication at New Scientist. And now at Cosmic Log at MSNBC.

More blog coverage for the TV Paper

      Posted on: Oct 1st, 2010 at 2:09 pm ; No Comments

Thanks to the HBR story, here’s another blog that covered the TV Commercials paper.

 

http://www.bnet.com/blog/harvard/research-shocker-tv-viewers-prefer-ads-with-their-shows/8475

Blog Coverage for The Virtues of Opaque Prose: How Lay Beliefs About Fluency Influence Perceptions of Quality

      Posted on: Sep 28th, 2010 at 8:12 pm ; No Comments

Duane Smith over at Abnormal Interests posted a nice little bit about the Fluency paper. Thanks for the coverage!

Duane apparently found out about our research via the Mark Twain Forum, which heard about it on the Boston Globe.

 

 

HBR: Commercials Make Us Like TV More

      Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2010 at 2:55 pm ; No Comments

Better late then never, I suppose. Harvard Business Review has an article covering the TV Commercials paper. The article is here.

More coverage about the TV Commercials Paper

      Posted on: Sep 13th, 2010 at 12:18 pm ; No Comments

HBR is covering our paper (better late than never), and a blogger picked up an interview that Leif did about said coverage.

 

Here it is.

Intuitive Biases in Choice vs. Estimation: Implications for the Wisdom of Crowds

      Posted on: Sep 6th, 2010 at 5:57 am ; No Comments

Simmons, Joseph P., Leif D. Nelson, Jeff Galak, and Shane Frederick (2011), “Intuitive Biases in Choice vs. Estimation: Implications for the Wisdom of Crowds,” Journal of Consumer Research, 38 (1), 1-15. [SSRN] [Paper]

ACR 2010 – Processing Fluency and Satiation

      Posted on: Jul 1st, 2010 at 11:10 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, and Joseph Redden (2010), “Processing Fluency and Satiation”, Paper  presented at the annual conference for the Association for Consumer Research, Jacksonville, FL.

ACR 2010 – Micro-financing Decisions

      Posted on: Jul 1st, 2010 at 11:10 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Deborah Small, and Andrew Stephen (2010), “Micro-financing Decisions”, Paper presented at the annual conference for the Association for Consumer Research, Jacksonville, FL.

UCSD Talk – The Malleability of Satiation

      Posted on: Jul 1st, 2010 at 11:08 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2010), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at the Rady School of Business, University of California: San Diego, San Diego, CA.

CBDR Talk – The Malleability of Satiation

      Posted on: Jul 1st, 2010 at 11:07 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2010), “The Malleability of Satiation”, Invited talk at the Center for Behavioral Decision Research, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

BDRM 2010 – Processing Fluency and Satiation

      Posted on: Jul 1st, 2010 at 11:05 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Joseph Redden (2010), “Processing Fluency and Satiation”, Paper presented at the Behavioral Decision Research in Management Conference, Pittsburgh, PA.

BDRM 2010 – The Effect of Decision Ease and Option Valence on Preference Projection

      Posted on: Jul 1st, 2010 at 11:05 am ; No Comments

Simmons, Joseph P., Leif D. Nelson, and Jeff Galak (2010), “The Effect of Decision Ease and Option Valence on Preference Projection”, Paper presented at the Behavioral Decision Research in Management Conference, Pittsburgh, PA.

Swedish Media Coverage

      Posted on: May 5th, 2010 at 6:36 pm ; No Comments

Ulf Clarén, a journalist for the Swedish newspaper Sydsvenskan recently emailed me about the TV Commercials Paper. Here’s the resulting article. Feel free to translate it for me.

2010 – Recipient of CMU Berkman Faculty Development Grant

      Posted on: May 3rd, 2010 at 1:47 pm ; No Comments

2010 – Recipient of CMU Berkman Faculty Development Grant

BP Junior Faculty Chair

      Posted on: Apr 21st, 2010 at 12:59 pm ; No Comments

A few moments ago the Dean and Deputy Dean called me to their office. First, I’m not fired, which, of course, is the first thought that crosses your mind when two Deans want to see you. It was actually just the opposite: I was awarded the BP Junior Faculty Chair! That means my teaching requirement goes down by one point with the goal of spending that time on research.  I’m honored and excited!

2010 – BP Junior Faculty Chair

      Posted on: Apr 21st, 2010 at 12:57 pm ; No Comments

2010 – BP Junior Faculty Chair

Behavioral Research with Flash Workshop at NYU – April 2010

      Posted on: Mar 9th, 2010 at 3:13 pm ; No Comments

 

(Updated 4/05/2010)

Welcome to the information page for the Programming Experiment in Flash Workshop. Here you will find all the required resources.

Workshop Schedule:

  • Session 1: Thursday, April 8th (10-12pm)
  • Session 2: Thursday, April 8th (2 – 4pm)
  • Session 3: Friday, April 9th  (10-12pm)
  • Location:
    • Thursday: KMC 4-120 (44 W. 4th St.)
    • Friday: KMC 4-120

Required/Recommended Programs

  1. Adobe Flash CS4 – http://www.adobe.com/products/flash/
    • This is the primary program used to create experiments. You can download a free trial at the link above or you can see if your IT dept has a license for it.
    • Although version CS4 is not required, it is the one I will be using during the workshop. If you have an older version, you will be fine.
    • Although I am using CS4, all Actionscript is version 2.0 (not 3.0). If you don’t know what this means, don’t worry about it.
  2. EditPad Pro – http://www.editpadpro.com/
    • This is a very versatile and free text editing software we will use for editing PhP documents.
    • By no means is this particular program required, but I text editor slightly more advanced than Notepad will make your life easier.
  3. Filezilla (Client) – http://filezilla-project.org/
    • This is a free FTP program that we will use to upload all of our files to a web server.
    • Like EditPad Pro, you do not need this particular program, but it is quite good and the one I will use.

Introductory Resources

  1. Flash Introduction (University of Kansas ) – http://www.techdocs.ku.edu/docs/flash_mx2004_introduction.pdf
    • This is a very nice introduction to the basics of Flash done by the Academic Computing Services of the University of Kansas.
    • This document uses Flash MX 2004, but the basics are all the same as CS4.
    • Feel free to ignore everything related to animation (e.g. Tweening) as it is not relevant for this workshop.
  2. Total Training Videos – http://www.totaltraining.com/prod/adobe/flashpro8.asp
    • Total Training is a teaching product that has instructional videos for a lot of computer related products.
    • I don’t suggest that you go out and buy the Flash videos, but they do provide quite a few of the introductory ones for free. Just go to the above link and click on “Free Tutorials.”
    • Follow the instructions and you’ll be taken to the videos. I suggest going through as much as you can in the courses “Flash Professional 8” and “Flash Professional 8 – Actionscript,” You can check out the Flash CS3 tutorials too, but I suspect they will be redundant.

Important Files

  1. Download this zip file to get all files described below (http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/nyu2010/files.zip)
  2. Workshop Files 1-
    • The folder contains:
      1. workshopfiles.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
      2. workshopfiles.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      3. workshopfiles.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      4. workshopfiles.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      5. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      6. workshopfilesdebrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      7. jeff.jpg: An image used in the program
      8. leff.jpg: Another image.
    • You can see what the final version looks like here: http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/nyu2010/workshopfiles/workshopfiles.php
  3. Workshop Files 2 –
    • The folder contains:
      1. workshopfiles2.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
      2. workshopfiles2.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      3. workshopfiles2.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      4. workshopfiles2.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      5. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      6. workshopfiles2debrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      7. forthebirds.flv: Video file for the program.
      8. lifted.flv: Another video file for the program.
  4. MP3 Study Files
    • The folder contains:
      1. MP3 Study Template.doc: what we’ll base our first study off of.
      2. mp3player1.jpg: a file we need for the program
      3. mp3player2.jpg: a file we need for the program
  5. Experiment Check List

I will also upload all the powerpoint slides as they are created. We wind up making lots of changes during the sessions, so I’ll only upload them afterwards. HOWEVER, I will bring print outs for everyone to take notes on.

  1. Powerpoint for Session 1
  2. Powerpoint for Session 2
  3. Powerpoint for Session 3

 


Other Useful Information (to be populated as needed):

1. Here are the most frequently used HTML tags to use when formatting text in a dynamic text box. Remember, you MUST a) check the “render as HTML” box for the dynamic text box and b) send the data via a variable (as opposed to via the ‘text’ property). So here’s an example of correct formatting: outputtext = “<b>This is a test</b>”;

  • Bold: <b></b> (use: <b>This is a test</b>   Results in: This is a test)
  • Underline: <u></u> (use: <u>This is a test</u>   Results in: This is a test)
  • Italics: <i></i> (use: <i>This is a test</i>   Results in: This is a test)
  • Colors: <font color=’#FF0000′></font> (use: <font color=’#FF0000′>This is a test</font>   Results in: This is a test)

2. As promised, here is the “baseprogram_all.fla” file. This contains all the different scales, inputs and whatnot for you to use as you see fit.

  • In this program, I’ve added radio buttons and a way to show a “red x” on top of an image.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at jgalak@cmu.edu

 

 

Sub-Optimality in Micro-Financing Decisions: When Groups Receive Less Than an Individual – SCP 2010

      Posted on: Mar 4th, 2010 at 2:44 pm ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Deborah Small, and Andrew Stephen (2010), “Sub-Optimality in Micro-Financing Decisions: When Groups Receive Less Than an Individual.” Paper presented at the Society for Consumer Psychology Annual Conference, St. Pete Beach, FL

Are Crowds Wise or Ignorant when Predicting against Point Spreads? It Depends on How You Ask

      Posted on: Dec 8th, 2009 at 11:39 am ; No Comments

Simmons, Joseph. P., Leif D. Nelson, Jeff Galak, and Shane Frederick (2009), “Are Crowds Wise or Ignorant when Predicting against Point Spreads? It Depends on How You Ask.” Paper presented at the Society for Judgment and Decision Making conference, Boston, MA.

I guess CMU likes me

      Posted on: Oct 8th, 2009 at 3:50 pm ; No Comments

Aside from hiring me, CMU is sending some strong cues that they like what I’m up to. Today I was featured on the front pages of both the CMU and Tepper websites.

I am genuinely flattered.

Kyung, Ellie

      Posted on: Aug 26th, 2009 at 3:50 pm ; No Comments

Marketing 1 – 70381, Lectures 1 and 2 (Fall 2009)

      Posted on: Jul 27th, 2009 at 12:31 pm ; No Comments

The course syllabus can be downloaded here: 70381 – Marketing 1 – Fall 2009 Syllabus v1.doc
The weekly schedule can be downloaded here: 70381 – Marketing 1 – Fall 2009 Weekly Schedule v1.doc

Class wiki: http://www1.atwiki.com/galak70381fall2009

Behavioral Research with Flash Workshop at UCLA– July 2009

      Posted on: Jun 29th, 2009 at 3:52 pm ; No Comments

(Updated 7/27/2009)

Welcome to the information page for the Programming Experiment in Flash Workshop. Here you will find all the required resources.

Workshop Schedule:

  • Session 1: Thursday, July 23rd (10-12pm)
  • Session 2: Thursday, July 23rd (2 – 4pm)
  • Session 3: Friday, July 24th (10-12pm)
  • Session 4: Friday, July 24th (2-4pm)
  • Location:

Required/Recommended Programs

  1. Adobe Flash CS4 – http://www.adobe.com/products/flash/
    • This is the primary program used to create experiments. You can download a free trial at the link above or you can see if your IT dept has a license for it.
    • Although version CS4 is not required, it is the one I will be using during the workshop. If you have an older version, you will be fine.
    • Although I am using CS4, all Actionscript is version 2.0 (not 3.0). If you don’t know what this means, don’t worry about it.
  2. EditPad Pro – http://www.editpadpro.com/
    • This is a very versatile and free text editing software we will use for editing PhP documents.
    • By no means is this particular program required, but I text editor slightly more advanced than Notepad will make your life easier.
  3. Filezilla (Client) – http://filezilla-project.org/
    • This is a free FTP program that we will use to upload all of our files to a web server.
    • Like EditPad Pro, you do not need this particular program, but it is quite good and the one I will use.

Introductory Resources

  1. Flash Introduction (University of Kansas ) – http://www.techdocs.ku.edu/docs/flash_mx2004_introduction.pdf
    • This is a very nice introduction to the basics of Flash done by the Academic Computing Services of the University of Kansas.
    • This document uses Flash MX 2004, but the basics are all the same as CS4.
    • Feel free to ignore everything related to animation (e.g. Tweening) as it is not relevant for this workshop.
  2. Total Training Videos – http://www.totaltraining.com/prod/adobe/flashpro8.asp
    • Total Training is a teaching product that has instructional videos for a lot of computer related products.
    • I don’t suggest that you go out and buy the Flash videos, but they do provide quite a few of the introductory ones for free. Just go to the above link and click on “Free Tutorials.”
    • Follow the instructions and you’ll be taken to the videos. I suggest going through as much as you can in the courses “Flash Professional 8” and “Flash Professional 8 – Actionscript,” You can check out the Flash CS3 tutorials too, but I suspect they will be redundant.

Important Files

  1. Workshop Files 1- http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/workshopfiles/workshopfiles.zip
    • The above is a zip file containing 9 files that you’ll need. They are:
      1. workshopfiles.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
      2. workshopfiles_FLASH8.fla: This is the same file as above but compatible with Flash 8 and newer. I’m guessing that many of you will use this version. It has the exact same structure and code, so don’t worry about the compatibility issues.
      3. workshopfiles.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      4. workshopfiles.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      5. workshopfiles.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      6. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      7. workshopfilesdebrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      8. jeff.jpg: An image used in the program
      9. leff.jpg: Another image.
    • You can see what the final version looks like here: http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/workshopfiles/workshopfiles.php
  2. Workshop Files 2 – http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/workshopfiles2/workshopfiles2.zip
    • The above is a zip file containing 9 files that you’ll need. They are:
      1. workshopfiles2.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
      2. workshopfiles2_FLASH8.fla: This is the same file as above but compatible with Flash 8 and newer. I’m guessing that many of you will use this version. It has the exact same structure and code, so don’t worry about the compatibility issues.
      3. workshopfiles2.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      4. workshopfiles2.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      5. workshopfiles2.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      6. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      7. workshopfiles2debrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      8. forthebirds.flv: Video file for the program.
      9. lifted.flv: Another video file for the program.
  3. Workshop Files 3 – http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/workshopfiles3/workshopfiles3.zip
      • The above is a zip file containing 5 files that you’ll need. They are:
        1. workshopfiles3.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
        2. workshopfiles3.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
        3. workshopfiles3.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
        4. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
        5. workshopfiles3debrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      • You can see what the final version looks like here: http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/workshopfiles2/workshopfiles2.php
  4. Powerpoint for Session 1 –http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/ppt/Flash Workshop – Session 1 v1.ppt
  5. Powerpoint for Session 2 –http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/ppt/Flash Workshop – Session 2 v1.ppt
  6. Powerpoint for Session 3 –http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/ppt/Flash Workshop – Session 3 v1.ppt
  7. Experiment Check List –http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/Experiment Check List.doc

Post workshop updates:

1. MP3 Experiment Files: http://jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/mp3/mp3.zip

  • The above zip file contains all the files we used/created during the second session of the workshop (MP3 Study). I have updated it to use the correct image files and cleaned up some of the layout. The files are:
    1. mp3.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
    2. mp3.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
    3. mp3.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
    4. mp3.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
    5. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
    6. workshopfilesdebrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
    7. leff.jpg: An image used in the program
    8. jeff.jpg: Another image.
    9. MP3 Study Template.doc: The template for the study.
  • You can test the program at: http://jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/mp3/mp3.php

2. As promised, here are the most frequently used HTML tags to use when formatting text in a dynamic text box. Remember, you MUST a) check the “render as HTML” box for the dynamic text box and b) send the data via a variable (as opposed to via the ‘text’ property). So here’s an example of correct formatting: outputtext = “<b>This is a test</b>”;

  • Bold: <b></b> (use: <b>This is a test</b>   Results in: This is a test)
  • Underline: <u></u> (use: <u>This is a test</u>   Results in: This is a test)
  • Italics: <i></i> (use: <i>This is a test</i>   Results in: This is a test)
  • Colors: <font color=’#FF0000′></font> (use: <font color=’#FF0000′>This is a test</font>   Results in: This is a test)

3. The .fla for the updated version of flashworkshop2 that includes the discontinuous measure of enjoyment scale. http://jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/workshopfiles2/workshopfiles2b.fla

4. I created a very simple roll over box that disappears when the mouse hovers over it and appears when the mouse leaves. It was a bit tricky to do this, so let me explain what I did.

  1. Created a text box that contains some information.
  2. Placed a box (that was converted into an object called “box”) in the layer above the text.
  3. Within the “box” object, I created two frames. The first contains a blue box and the second contains the same box but with the color Alpha set to zero (this can be set in the color selector). What this means is that the box in frame 2 exists, but it is transparent.
  4. I then added this code to the main actionscript (in the main timeline, not the one for the box):
    box.OnRollOver = function(){
    box.gotoAndStop(2);
    }
    box.onRollOut = function (){
    box.gotoAndStop(1);
    }
  5. What this does is say that when the mouse is over the box, go to frame 2 of the box timeline (which contains an invisible box). Then when the mouse leaves, it goes to frame 1 (which contains the blue box).
  6. You can download a copy of the working program here:
    http://jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/ucla/workshopfiles3/workshopfiles4.fla

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at jgalak@cmu.edu

WZPT Star 100.7 Morning Show

      Posted on: Jun 25th, 2009 at 11:28 am ; No Comments

I recently did an interview with Shelley Duffy of WZPT Star 100.7‘s Morning Show about the Variety Amnesia paper. The segment aired this week and here’s the mp3.

How to Bring Back that Lovin’ Feeling

      Posted on: Jun 17th, 2009 at 3:47 pm ; No Comments

Robin Lloyd over at Live Science also picked up on the variety paper. The article can be found here.

The article was also apparently syndicated to:
MSNBC
US News and World Report
KAKE 10…an ABC channel
WSAW 7…a CBS channel

Yahoo! News

Mixing memory with reality can bring pleasure to the routine

      Posted on: Jun 17th, 2009 at 3:03 pm ; No Comments

I was recently interviewed by Lynne Peeples over at ScientificAmerican.com about the Variety Amnesia paper with Justin and Joe. The resulting article can be found here.

This is the first time I’ve been referred to as Professor in print. Feels pretty good!

Business Wire – Research Debunks Perception that State or National Lines Offer Protection from Swine Flu

      Posted on: Jun 16th, 2009 at 2:37 pm ; No Comments

The PR folks at Stern asked Justin to put together a press release about our borders research. Here’s what just came across business wire.

Link.

The Construction of Satiation: Recalling Related Intervening Experiences Accelerates Recovery from Satiation – EMAC 2009

      Posted on: Jun 6th, 2009 at 5:27 am ; No Comments

Galak, JeffJoseph Redden, and Justin Kruger (2009), “The Construction of Satiation: Recalling Related Intervening Experiences Accelerates Recovery from Satiation.” Paper presented at the European Marketinc Association Conference (EMAC), Nantes, France (Session chair).

Too Much of a Good Thing: Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Unintended Satiation – La Londe 2009

      Posted on: Jun 6th, 2009 at 5:25 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2009), “Too Much of a Good Thing: Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Unintended Satiation.” Paper presented at the La Londe Conference on Consumer Behavior, La Londe Les Maures, France.

2009 – Herman E. Krooss Award For Distinction and Presentation of an Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation

      Posted on: May 13th, 2009 at 3:13 pm ; No Comments

2009 – Herman E. Krooss Award For Distinction and Presentation of an Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation

More coverage…by the weather service?

      Posted on: Apr 23rd, 2009 at 10:33 am ; No Comments

Tom picked up on this very random coverage of the TV paper on a Hawaiian weather website. Scroll down to “Interesting 5”

Hawaiian Islands weather details & Aloha paragraphs / February 24-25, 2009

The Belgian Press

      Posted on: Apr 2nd, 2009 at 9:19 am ; No Comments

As Tom put it, finally we’ve been covered by the Belgian press: http://www.standaard.be/Artikel/Detail.aspx?artikelId=D228EOVO

TV Commercials in India

      Posted on: Mar 27th, 2009 at 9:15 am ; No Comments

Turns out the research has been picked up as far as India.

Watching commercials leads to greater enjoyment of TV programs

The Psych Files

      Posted on: Mar 17th, 2009 at 9:46 pm ; No Comments

Michael over at The Psych Files, did a very thorough podcast about the TV Commercials paper.

Have a listen here: Episode 89: Don’t Touch That Dial! Why You Should Love Commercials

Pittsburgh

      Posted on: Mar 15th, 2009 at 4:13 pm ; No Comments

My new home:

beautiful-downtown-pittsburgh

Bax & O’Brien on WAQY

      Posted on: Mar 12th, 2009 at 9:42 am ; No Comments

Bax & O’Brien of WAQY, a Massachusetts radio station interviewed me the other day. Fun interview!

Listen here.

NPR’s Day to Day

      Posted on: Mar 11th, 2009 at 1:24 pm ; No Comments

Joel Rose asked me to go to NPR’s NY studio to chat about the TV Commercials paper. It was really interesting to be in an actual studio (as opposed to a phone interview). Of course, as always, it would have  been nice to actually get some more air time, but I’ll take what I can get.

Listen here.

Washington Post

      Posted on: Mar 8th, 2009 at 2:30 pm ; No Comments

Monica Hesse of the Washington Post interviewed me a few days ago and put out this interesting article. It speaks to the idea that TV shows are structured to include commercial breaks and that without them the flow of the program is hurt. She also applies our findings to corroborate her point. All in all, a very nice article.

Give Us a Commercial Break!

Leif Nelson on CBC Radio

      Posted on: Mar 5th, 2009 at 5:35 pm ; No Comments

Leif was interviewed on CBC’s The Point.

Have a listen. (Part 1: Start at 17:36)

Tom Meyvis on Fox News

      Posted on: Mar 4th, 2009 at 5:24 pm ; No Comments

Fox News did a very silly segment (3/3/2009 7:27:50pm EST) about the TV Commercials paper. They took a 5 minutes interview with Tom Meyvis and turned it into 10 seconds of Tom and 60 seconds of random people on the street saying that commercials are stupid. 

After quite a bit of effort, I’ve managed to get the video all set up. Enjoy.

Gawker

      Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2009 at 1:53 pm ; No Comments

Science: You Love Commercials

Single most entertaining reader comment:

To corroborate: I find that my erections are longer lasting and more enjoyable if I take an occasional break from mercilessly beating my manservant about the chest, neck and thighs. [The Hon JudgeSmails]

The Take Away

      Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2009 at 9:35 am ; No Comments

Benedict Carey, the author of the NYT article about our research was interviews on The Take Away this morning. I find it funny that the interviewer thought it was best to interview someone one step removed from the research rather than someone who actually conducted it. 

Commercial breaks may be good for the brain

New York Times!

      Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2009 at 7:21 pm ; No Comments

This is the biggest one yet: the NYT. I couldn’t be happier.

Liked the Show? Maybe It Was the Commercials

It just keeps coming…

      Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2009 at 3:45 pm ; No Comments

The Telegraph

SerienJunkies (Dutch)

ABC News Blog

4VF.net

Entertainment & Showbiz.com

MeD India

Buzz7

Ma.hu (Hungary)

Fox Toledo 

San Diego Union-Tribune (Front page on the print version!)

Time Magazine!

      Posted on: Mar 1st, 2009 at 9:05 pm ; No Comments

Sean Gregory of Time Magazine wrote a very thorough article about the TV Commercials Paper. It can be found here: Do TV Commercials Make you Happier?

More blogs and some foreign press

      Posted on: Feb 26th, 2009 at 2:32 pm ; No Comments

JCR put out their press release and now there’s even more coverage. Tom just did an interview for BBC and I did one for the Washington Post (will post separately when the article gets written) and am doing another for NPR on Monday. I suspect that no paper I write will ever get as much coverage as this one has gotten.

Globe and Mail

David Hauslaib’s Jossip

Hartfort Courant

Science Daily

Sindh Today

Science Mode

The Undercurrent

Teknikka&Talous (Finland)

Forte (Estonia)

Hartford Courant

Silver Scorpio

Crowd-sourcing Logos

      Posted on: Feb 9th, 2009 at 8:13 pm ; No Comments

For the first time in a while, I actually clicked on a banner ad. Facebook linked me to Logo Tournament, a site for crowd-sourcing logo designs. The idea is that you post your requirments for a logo and put up some prize money (min = $250). Then you let all those out of work graphic designers out there compete for your love. Okay, just your approval, but you get the idea. I browsed around a bit and have to say that I am

NYTimes…almost

      Posted on: Feb 9th, 2009 at 6:50 pm ; No Comments

The TV Commercials paper was covered ty the Freakonimcs Blog. That’s ALMOST like being in the NY Times…almost.

Stephen, Andrew

      Posted on: Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:55 pm ; No Comments

A chance to respond!

      Posted on: Feb 4th, 2009 at 8:26 pm ; No Comments

James Hibberd’s article at the Hollywood Reporter about the TV Commercials paper attracted quite a few negative comments from his readers. As such, he asked to interview me in order to get the story straight.

Here’s the interview. Let’s just hope it makes things clear for all those dissenting readers.

Reuters: Ads heighten pleasure of TV watching, study finds

      Posted on: Feb 4th, 2009 at 10:24 am ; No Comments

Again thanks to our PR folks, Reuters picked up the TV Commercials Paper. And that turned into quite a few syndications as you can see from the screenshot:

Google Search Screenshot

Huffington Post Coverage

      Posted on: Feb 3rd, 2009 at 3:01 pm ; No Comments

Thanks to the efforts of the Stern and Rady PR departments, the TV Commercial paper was covered on the Huffington Pos .and the Hollywood Reporter.  I’ll update this post if there is any new news.

PR: Business Wire

      Posted on: Feb 3rd, 2009 at 12:15 pm ; No Comments

The PR folks at Stern and Rady put out a press release on Business Wire this morning re the TV Commercial paper. Let’s see what comes of it.

Variety Amnesia: Recalling Past Variety Can Accelerate Recovery From Satiation

      Posted on: Jan 30th, 2009 at 4:56 pm ; No Comments

My paper with Joseph Redden and Justin Kruger, “Variety Amnesia: Recalling Past Variety Can Accelerate Recovery From Satiation”, has just been conditionally accepted at the Journal of Consumer Research! Time to celebrate.

And even more blog coverage…

      Posted on: Jan 25th, 2009 at 10:34 am ; No Comments

I wish bloggers would contact me or one of my coauthors about their posts. For now, google is helping me find the coverage:

Cogsci Librarian

This is Herd

Ad Week

And more blog coverage…

      Posted on: Jan 25th, 2009 at 10:29 am ; No Comments

Thanks to Jesse I now know about two more blogs that covered the TV Commercials paper. 

Pop Matters

The Atlantic

Future Tense: Skipping the DVR skip button might help you enjoy television more

      Posted on: Jan 20th, 2009 at 7:03 pm ; No Comments

Here’s the radio  interview that I recently did for Future Tense.

Link to interview.

And more coverage: Fast Company

      Posted on: Jan 19th, 2009 at 6:28 pm ; No Comments

Brian Reich at Fast Company also picked up the TV Commercials paper. Here’s the story:  “Commercials Improve TV? I seriously doubt that.” Brian freely admits that he has only read the Boston Globe blurb and our abstract, but still goes after us. Without reading the paper itself, his criticisms appear fair, but are all acknowledged and refuted in the paper.

Boston Globe Coverage

      Posted on: Jan 19th, 2009 at 6:06 pm ; 2 Comments

Kevin Lewis over at the Boston Globe apparently got wind of the TV Commercials article and wrote a small blurb yesterday. Here’s the link and here’s the copy: 

WITH THE ADOPTION of digital video recorders, fewer people watch commercials on TV anymore. After all, it’s not like anyone wants to watch commercials (except during the Super Bowl, maybe). However, new research says that you may be missing out. When college students were asked to watch an episode of “Taxi,” they enjoyed the version with commercials more than the version without commercials. The same thing happened when watching a nature show, such that students who watched the version with commercials were more willing to donate to wildlife preservation. The effect arises because the novelty of an experience can wear off, and a break can reset one’s attention. There are a couple caveats to the effect, though: It doesn’t apply to older people (with their longer attention spans), or to exciting shows. Of course, if younger people watch only exciting shows, then advertisers may be out of luck anyway.

It’s obviously nice to get the coverage, but it would have been nicer had Mr. Lewis contacted one of us for a comment. Then, perhaps, he wouldn’t have been quite so dramatic in his statments of when and for whom this effect doesn’t apply.

The Blogosphere and Academic Research

      Posted on: Jan 17th, 2009 at 4:01 pm ; 2 Comments

Recently, Ars Technica, a technology blog wrote a nice summary of the paper that Leif, Tom and I published, “Enhancing the Television Viewing Experience through Commercial Interruptions”. I was actually quite surprised by the depth of the post and the fact that the author likely read the entire paper and not just the abstract (or title). He understood the main ideas and didn’t cherry pick topics to suit his needs. I commend him for this. 

However, the comments posted in response to this post are absolutely hilarious. One of the major points of this paper is that despite the fact that TV commercials often make the TV show in which they are embedded more enjoyable, people fail to appreciate this. Let me say that again, people fail to appreciate this. And yet, the vast majority of the comments are of the form: “I don’t believe this research. After all, I hate commercials.” I couldn’t ask for anything better. Here are some choice examples:

Sorry, I’m not buying it.

Watching a TV show on DVD is SO much better than mainly because of no commercials.

I always skip through the commercials when watching stuff on the DVR which is 90+ Percentage of all my TV watching.

And another:

The fact that a lot people keep watching a series when they record it and skip the commercials proves that the study couldn’t be more wrong. Hell, some even only watch recorded shows just to skip the commercials. Others even drop cable and satellite in favor of watching the same shows on DVD, Hulu or even Bittorrent! I’m sorry, but real world evidence is completely counter to the study’s biased results.

I love that his example “proves that the study couldn’t be more wrong.”

We also make a point in the paper that this effect can not be due to contrast effects. In other words, commercials don’t make the show more enjoyable because they make the television program look better by comparison. We demonstrate this in one experiment by including a  commercial break that is as enjoyable as the program and in another experiment where all participants receive the same commercials, just that for some of them the commercials disrupt the program and for others they don’t.  Here’s a great comment suggesting just the opposite:

This is like saying if you eat dog crap in between meals, your regular food will taste better. Although it’s probably true, I’d rather just not eat the dog crap.

There was also a decent amount of inquiry as to who funded this research. The simple answer is that the Stern School of Business did. There was absolutely no outside funding and their was no subversive purpose to the research. Then again, from the comments:

Now, who wants to lay down a bet that this was funded by an ad company?

All in all, I’m simply very amused. People in the blogosphere often don’t read the entire paper (though I again commend the author of the original post for doing so) and choose to instead ignorantly criticize everything. On the surface it’s entertaining, but there is a more sinister side to this ignorance. Commenters will walk away thinking that they understand a concept that they really don’t. They will propagate this misinformation throughout the virtual and real world. And they will subsequently create false knowledge. This is the exact opposite goal of scientific inquiry and a real problem.

Oh well, for now I’ll stick with this being entertaining.

First Press Interview

      Posted on: Jan 17th, 2009 at 3:39 pm ; No Comments

I recently  had the pleasure of chatting on the phone with Jon Gordon of Future Tense, a radio personality for Minnesota Public Radio. Jon interviewed me about the paper that Leif, Tom, and I recently had electronically published at the Journal of Consumer Research, “Enhancing the Television Viewing Experience through Commercial Interruptions.” I have to admit that I was a bit nervous, but Jon did a great job of asking me poignant questions that (hopefully) yielded coherent and thoughtful answers. 

The interview will likely air on Monday, though not in NYC. Thankfully, the broadcast will also go out over the internet and will be saved as a podcast and downloadable MP3 (all at this site).

I can’t wait to hear how it comes out!

Portrait

      Posted on: Jan 14th, 2009 at 5:13 pm ; No Comments

Jeff Galak Portrait

Carnegie Mellon asked me to have a professional portrait taken for their website. I figured they wouldn’t object to me using the portrait for this site as well.  

I would like to thank Dennis at The Visual Image in Merrick, NY who was both very professional and quite fun. I’m quite pleased with the final product and hope you are too.

Collecting Experimental Data Online: Consumer Behavior Lab

      Posted on: Jan 12th, 2009 at 8:35 pm ; No Comments

For those of you that don’t know, a couple of years ago I created consumerbehaviorlab.com, an online research lab. I primarily use Flash to program the experiments and have collected a great deal of invaluable data. To date, my colleagues and I have run 80 experiments and collected data from 14,056 participants. Not bad for just over 2 years of up time! There are currently 2,755 active participants of varied demographic backgrounds. 

This isn’t an attempt to brag, but rather a suggestion for other behavioral researchers: collect data online! It’s easy, fast, and inexpensive. We usually let participants participate for about 5 days (though 95% complete the study within 24 hours) and pay them with entry into a $50 lottery. When was the last time “real life” participants came that cheaply? So if you have the means, go out and conquer! There is much data to be had.

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about online data collection, so if you have any questions about how I do it, don’t hesitate to ask.

Site Launch

      Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009 at 3:53 pm ; 1 Comment

Welcome to my new academic page!

I plan to keep all my academic happenings up to date and perhaps even provide some commentary on what is going on in the academic world.

I would like to thank the excelent developers at Vercingetorix Technologies for building this site. The bulk of the work was building the back-end  (all WordPress) and I couldn’t be more pleased with how it turned out. The idea is that every entry (publication, presentation, collaborator, etc…) is its own “blog post” and thus can be very easily updated and/or moved around (Working Paper -> Publication…assuming all goes well!). 

If you have any questions about the content of the site or the development process, feel free to contact me at jgalak@stern.nyu.edu.

Introduction to Marketing at NYU – C55.0001.01.su08 (Summer 2008)

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:14 am ; No Comments

For a copy of the syllabus, click here: syllabus_c550001001su08-2008_05_12.doc

Behavioral Research with Flash Workshop at USC – January 2009

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:13 am ; No Comments

(Updated 2/19/2009)

IMPORTANT UPDATE

There was a small error in the parseflash.php file that causes an annoying data handling problem. It is nothing major (all your data will still store properly), but here is the correct version. Please simply replace the on you have.

Download: http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/workshopfiles/parseflash.php.
In order to download the file, right-click on the link and select “Save As”
Please note that I have updated all of the zip files below to reflect the change


Welcome to the information page for the Programming Experiment in Flash Workshop. Here you will find all the required resources.  

Workshop Schedule:

  • Session 1: Thursday, January 29th (2-4pm): Intro to Web Programming, PhP, and Flash
  • Session 2: Friday, January 30th (10-12pm): Building Your First Flash Experiment
  • Session 3: Friday, January 30th (3-5pm): Advanced Topics if Flash(Sounds, Videos, and Real Time Ratings)
  • Location: USC – Hoffman Hall, Room 303

Required/Recommended Programs

  1. Adobe Flash CS4 – http://www.adobe.com/products/flash/
    • This is the primary program used to create experiments. You can download a free trial at the link above or you can see if your IT dept has a license for it.
    • Although version CS4 is not required, it is the one I will be using during the workshop. If you have an older version, you will be fine.
    • Although I am using CS4, all Actionscript is version 2.0 (not 3.0). If you don’t know what this means, don’t worry about it.
  2. EditPad Pro – http://www.editpadpro.com/
    • This is a very versatile and free text editing software we will use for editing PhP documents.
    • By no means is this particular program required, but I text editor slightly more advanced than Notepad will make your life easier.
  3. Filezilla (Client) – http://filezilla-project.org/
    • This is a free FTP program that we will use to upload all of our files to a web server.
    • Like EditPad Pro, you do not need this particular program, but it is quite good and the one I will use.

Introductory Resources

  1. Flash Introduction (University of Kansas ) – http://www.techdocs.ku.edu/docs/flash_mx2004_introduction.pdf
    • This is a very nice introduction to the basics of Flash done by the Academic Computing Services of the University of Kansas.
    • This document uses Flash MX 2004, but the basics are all the same as CS4.
    • Feel free to ignore everything related to animation (e.g. Tweening) as it is not relevant for this workshop.
  2. Total Training Videos – http://www.totaltraining.com/prod/adobe/flashpro8.asp
    • Total Training is a teaching product that has instructional videos for a lot of computer related products.
    • I don’t suggest that you go out and buy the Flash videos, but they do provide quite a few of the introductory ones for free. Just go to the above link and click on “Free Tutorials.”
    • Follow the instructions and you’ll be taken to the videos. I suggest going through as much as you can in the courses “Flash Professional 8” and “Flash Professional 8 – Actionscript,” You can check out the Flash CS3 tutorials too, but I suspect they will be redundant.

Important Files

  1. Workshop Files for Session 1 – http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/workshopfiles/workshopfiles.zip
    • The above is a zip file containing 9 files that you’ll need. They are:
      1. workshopfiles.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
      2. workshopfiles_FLASH8.fla: This is the same file as above but compatible with Flash 8 and newer. I’m guessing that many of you will use this version. It has the exact same structure and code, so don’t worry about the compatibility issues.
      3. workshopfiles.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      4. workshopfiles.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      5. workshopfiles.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      6. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      7. workshopfilesdebrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      8. jeff.jpg: An image used in the program
      9. leff.jpg: Another image.
    • You can see what the final version looks like here: http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/workshopfiles/workshopfiles.php
  2. Workshop Files for Session 3 – hhttp://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/workshopfiles2/workshopfiles2.zip
    • The above is a zip file containing 9 files that you’ll need for Session 3. They are:
      1. workshopfiles2.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
      2. workshopfiles2_FLASH8.fla: This is the same file as above but compatible with Flash 8 and newer. I’m guessing that many of you will use this version. It has the exact same structure and code, so don’t worry about the compatibility issues.
      3. workshopfiles2.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      4. workshopfiles2.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      5. workshopfiles2.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      6. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      7. workshopfiles2debrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      8. forthebirds.flv: Video file for the program.
      9. lifted.flv: Another video file for the program.
  3. Powerpoint for Session 1 –http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/ppt/Flash Workshop – Session 1 v1.ppt
  4. Powerpoint for Session 2 –http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/ppt/Flash Workshop – Session 2 v1.ppt
  5. Powerpoint for Session 3 –http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/ppt/Flash Workshop – Session 3 v1.ppt
  6. Experiment Check List –http://www.jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/Experiment Check List.doc

 

 

 


   

Post Workshop Information/Resources

  1. Files for Session 2: http://jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/mp3/mp3.zip
    • The above zip file contains all the files we used/created during the second session of the workshop (MP3 Study). I have updated it to use the correct image files and cleaned up some of the layout. The files are:
      1. mp3.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 (or newer) and is what I will be using.
      2. mp3_FLASH8.fla: Same as above but for Flash 8 or newer.
      3. mp3.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      4. mp3.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      5. mp3.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      6. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      7. workshopfilesdebrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      8. mp3player1.jpg: An image used in the program
      9. mp3player2.jpg: Another image.
      10. MP3 Study Template.doc: The template for the study.
    • You can test the program at: http://jeffgalak.com/flashworkshop/usc/mp3/mp3.php
  2. As promised, here are the most frequently used HTML tags to use when formatting text in a dynamic text box. Remember, you MUST a) check the “render as HTML” box for the dynamic text box and b) send the data via a variable (as opposed to via the ‘text’ property). So here’s an example of correct formatting: outputtext = “<b>This is a test</b>”;
    • Bold: <b></b> (use: <b>This is a test</b>   Results in: This is a test)
    • Underline: <u></u> (use: <u>This is a test</u>   Results in: This is a test)
    • Italics: <i></i> (use: <i>This is a test</i>   Results in: This is a test)
    • Colors: <font color=’#FF0000′></font> (use: <font color=’#FF0000′>This is a test</font>   Results in: This is a test)
  3. “True” Randomization
    • Instead of sequentially assigning conditions, you may want to assign them randomly. To do this you use the Math.random() function. This generates a number between 0 and 1. Then you use conditional statements to assigns experimental conditions.
    • For example, let’s say you have 4 conditions: A,B,C, and D. You would write the following code:
    • tempnum = Math.random();
      if(tempnum < .25){condition = “A”;}
      else if(tempnum < .5){condition = “B”;}
      else if(tempnum < .75){condition = “C”;} 
      else {condition = “D”;}

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at jgalak@stern.nyu.edu

 

Vosgerau, Joachim

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:10 am ; No Comments

Small, Deborah

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:09 am ; No Comments

Simmons, Joseph P.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:08 am ; No Comments

Shalev, Edith

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:06 am ; No Comments

Redden, Joseph P.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:04 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif D.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:03 am ; No Comments

Meyvis, Tom

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 7:01 am ; No Comments

Loewenstein, George

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:59 am ; No Comments

Kruger, Justin

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:57 am ; No Comments

Frederick, Shane

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:55 am ; No Comments

Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:49 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Leif D. Nelson (2009), “Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition.” Paper presented at the Society for Consumer Psychology Annual Conference, San Diego, CA. (Session chair)

Too Much of a Good Thing: Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Unintended Satiation

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:48 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2009), “Too Much of a Good Thing: Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Unintended Satiation.” Paper presented at the Society for Consumer Psychology Annual Conference, San Diego, CA.

Mispredicting Adaptation and the Consequences of Unwanted Disruptions: When Advertisements Make Television Programs

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:47 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif D., Tom Meyvis, Jeff Galak (2009), “Mispredicting Adaptation and the Consequences of Unwanted Disruptions: When Advertisements Improve Television.” Paper presented at the Society for Consumer Psychology Annual Conference, San Diego, CA.

Too Much of a Good Thing: Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Unintended Satiation.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:47 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2008), “Too Much of a Good Thing: Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Unintended Satiation.” Paper presented at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference, San Francisco, CA.

Not In My Backyard: The Influence of Symbolic Boundaries On Consumer Choice.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:46 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and Paul Rozin (2008), “Not In My Backyard: The Influence of Symbolic Boundaries On Consumer Choice.” Paper presented at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference, San Francisco, CA.

The Construction of Satiation: Recalling Related Intervening Experiences Accelerates Recovery from Satiation.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:45 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Joseph Redden, and Justin Kruger (2008), “The Construction of Satiation: Recalling Related Intervening Experiences Accelerates Recovery from Satiation.” Paper presented at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference, San Francisco, CA.

Intuitive Confidence and the Effect of Option Valence on Preference Projection.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:44 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif. D., Joseph P. Simmons, and Jeff Galak (2008), “Intuitive Confidence and the Effect of Option Valence on Preference Projection.” Paper presented at the Association for Consumer Research Annual Conference, San Francisco, CA.

Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:43 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Leif D. Nelson (2008 ), “Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition.” Poster presented at the Summer Institute on Bounded Rationality in Psychology and Economics at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.

– Poster Award: Second Place

The Construction of Satiation: Recalling Related Intervening Experiences Accelerates Recovery from Satiation

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:42 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Joseph Redden and Justin Kruger (2008), “The Construction of Satiation: Recalling Related Intervening Experiences Accelerates Recovery from Satiation,” Paper presented at the Behavioral Decision Research in Management conference, San Diego, CA.

Are Crowds Wise or Ignorant when Predicting against Point Spreads? It Depends on How You Ask

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:41 am ; No Comments

Simmons, Joseph. P., Leif D. Nelson, Jeff Galak, and Shane Frederick (2008), “Are Crowds Wise or Ignorant when Predicting against Point Spreads? It Depends on How You Ask.” Paper presented at the Behavioral Decision Research in Management conference, San Diego, CA.

Rate Matters: The Effects of Inter-Consumption Intervals on Satiation and Variety Seeking Behavior

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:40 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2008), “Rate Matters: The Effects of Inter-Consumption Intervals on Satiation and Variety Seeking Behavior.” Paper presented at the Society for Consumer Psychology Conference, New Orleans, LA.

Predicting, Experiencing, and Reducing Hedonic Adaptation

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:39 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff (2007), “Predicting, Experiencing, and Reducing Hedonic Adaptation.” Invited presentation at Marketing in Israel 7, Jerusalem, Israel.

Not In My Backyard: The Influence of Symbolic Boundaries On Consumer Choice

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:38 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and Paul Rozin (2007), “Not In My Backyard: The Influence of Symbolic Boundaries On Consumer Choice.” Paper presented at the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, Long Beach, CA.

Mispredicting Adaptation and the Consequences of Unwanted Disruptions: When Advertisements Improve Television

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:38 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif D., Tom Meyvis, Jeff Galak (2007), “Mispredicting Adaptation and the Consequences of Unwanted Disruptions: When Advertisements Improve Television.” Paper presented at the Association of Consumer Research Annual Meeting, Memphis, TN.

The Unexpected Enjoyment of Expected Events: The Ill-fated Pursuit of Excitement in the Watching of Televised Sporting Events.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:36 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif D., Jeff Galak, and Joachim Vosgerau (2007), “The Unexpected Enjoyment of Expected Events: The Ill-fated Pursuit of Excitement in the Watching of Televised Sporting Events.” Paper presented at the Association of Consumer Research Annual Meeting, Memphis, TN.

Rate Matters: The Effects of Inter-Consumption Intervals on Satiation and Variety Seeking Behavior

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:35 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2007), “Rate Matters: The Effects of Inter-Consumption Intervals on Satiation and Variety Seeking Behavior.” Paper presented at the 21ST Subjective Probability, Utility, and Decision Making Conference at Warsaw, Poland.

Rate Matters: The Effects of Inter-Consumption Intervals on Satiation and Variety Seeking Behavior.

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:34 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2007), “Rate Matters: The Effects of Inter-Consumption Intervals on Satiation and Variety Seeking Behavior.” Paper presented at the Third Annual Whitebox Advisors Graduate Students Conference at Yale, New Haven, CT.

The Unexpected Enjoyment of Expected Events: The Ill-fated Pursuit of Excitement In the Watching of Televised Sporting Events

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:32 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif D., Jeff Galak, and Joachim Vosgerau (2007), “The Unexpected Enjoyment of Expected Events: The Ill-fated Pursuit of Excitement In the Watching of Televised Sporting Events.” Paper presented at the Society for Consumer Psychology, Las Vegas, NV.

Rate Matters: The Effects of Inter-Consumption Intervals on Satiation and Variety Seeking Behavior

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:30 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2007), “Rate Matters: The Effects of Inter-Consumption Intervals on Satiation and Variety Seeking Behavior.” Poster presented at the Judgment and Decision Making Pre-conference at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Conference, Memphis, TN.

The Unexpected Enjoyment of Expected Events: The Ill-fated Pursuit of Excitement In the Watching of Televised Sporting Events

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:29 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif. D., Jeff Galak, and Joachim Vosgerau (2006), “The Unexpected Enjoyment of Expected Events: The Ill-fated Pursuit of Excitement In the Watching of Televised Sporting Events” Paper presented at the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, Houston, Texas.

Watching a Timer Makes the Good Times Worse: How Expectations of Completion Impact In Experience Affect

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:21 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Edith Shalev, “Watching a Timer Makes the Good Times Worse: How Expectations of Completion Impact In Experience Affect.”

The Pain Was Greater If It Will Happen Again: The Effect of Continuation on Retrospective Discomfort

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:12 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Tom Meyvis (2011), “The Pain Was Greater If It Will Happen Again: The Effect of Continuation on Retrospective Discomfort,” forthcoming at the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 140(1), 63-75. [SSRN] [Paper]

The Virtues of Opaque Prose: How Lay Beliefs About Fluency Influence Perceptions of Quality

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:10 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Leif D. Nelson (2010), “The Virtues of Opaque Prose: How Lay Beliefs About Fluency Influence Perceptions of Quality.” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47 (1), 250-253 [SSRN] [Paper]

The Unexpected Enjoyment of Expected Events: The Ill-fated Pursuit of Excitement in Watching Televised Sporting Events

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 6:00 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif D., Jeff Galak, and Joachim Vosgerau, “The Unexpected Enjoyment of Expected Events: The Ill-fated Pursuit of Excitement in Watching Televised Sporting Events.”

Not In My Backyard: The Influence of Symbolic Boundaries on Consumer Choice

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 5:58 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Justin Kruger, and Paul Rozin, “Not In My Backyard: The Influence of Symbolic Boundaries on Consumer Choice,”[SSRN]

Mate Preferences in Social Cognitive Context: When Environmental and Personal Change Leads to Predictable Cross-cultural Variation

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 5:49 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif D., Terry F. Pettijohn, and Jeff Galak (2007), “Mate Preferences in Social Cognitive Context: When Environmental and Personal Change Leads to Predictable Cross-cultural Variation,” in Body Beautiful: Evolutionary and Sociocultural Perspectives , ed. Viren Swami and Adrian Furnham, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillian, 185-208. [Book]

Variety Amnesia: Recalling Past Variety Can Accelerate Recovery From Satiation

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 4:52 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff, Joseph Redden, and Justin Kruger (2009), “Variety Amnesia: Recalling Past Variety Can Accelerate Recovery From Satiation,”  Journal of Consumer Research, 36 (December), 575-584 .[Paper]  [SSRN]

Enhancing the Television Viewing Experience through Commercial Interruptions

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 1:38 am ; No Comments

Nelson, Leif D., Tom Meyvis, and Jeff Galak (2009),   “Enhancing the Television Viewing Experience through Commercial Interruptions,” Journal of Consumer Research, 36 (August), 160-172. [Paper] [SSRN]

Runner up for JCR Paper of the Year – 2009

Frederick, Shane

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 12:56 am ; No Comments

When Consumers’ Self-image Motives Fail

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 12:21 am ; No Comments

Kruger, Justin, Jeff Galak, and Jeremy Burrus (2007), “When Consumers’ Self-image Motives Fail,” Journal of Consumer Psychology, 17 (4), 250-253. [Paper]

Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition

      Posted on: Jan 6th, 2009 at 12:01 am ; No Comments

Galak, Jeff and Leif D. Nelson (2006), “Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition.” Poster presented at the Society for Judgment and Decision Making Annual Conference, Houston, Texas.

– Student Poster Award: First Place

2008 – Summer Institute on Bounded Rationality in Psychology and Economics – 2nd Place Poster Award:

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 11:46 pm ; No Comments

2008 – Summer Institute on Bounded Rationality in Psychology and Economics – 2nd Place Poster Award: “Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition” Galak, Jeff and Leif D. Nelson.

2008 – AMA Sheth Foundation Doctoral Consortium Fellow.

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 11:45 pm ; No Comments

2008 – AMA Sheth Foundation Doctoral Consortium Fellow.

2007 – 2nd Annual Judgment and Decision Making Pre-Conference (at SPSP) Travel Award.

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 11:44 pm ; No Comments

2007 – 2nd Annual Judgment and Decision Making Pre-Conference (at SPSP) Travel Award.

Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 11:43 pm ; No Comments

2006 – Society for Judgment and Decision Making– Best Student Poster Award. “Complexity is Good: When Disfluent Communication Signals Author Erudition” Galak, Jeff and Leif D. Nelson.

2001-05 – Dean John Guilfoil Scholarship.

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 11:43 pm ; No Comments

2001-05 – Dean John Guilfoil Scholarship.

2001-05 – Daniel E. Diamond Scholarship.

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 11:42 pm ; No Comments

2001-05 – Daniel E. Diamond Scholarship.

2001-05 – Stem Trustee Scholarship.

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 11:41 pm ; No Comments

2001-05 – Stem Trustee Scholarship.

Hello world!

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 10:59 pm ; No Comments

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Behavioral Research with Flash Workshop at NYU – August, 2008

      Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009 at 7:15 am ; No Comments

(Updated 8/18/2008)

Welcome to the information page for the Programming Experiment in Flash Workshop. Here you will find all the required resources.

Workshop Schedule:

 

Required/Recommended Programs

  1. Adobe Flash CS3 – http://www.adobe.com/products/flash/
    • This is the primary program used to create experiments. You can download a free trial at the link above or you can see if your IT dept has a license for it.
    • Although version CS3 is not required, it is the one I will be using during the workshop. If you have an older version, you will be fine.
  2. EditPad Pro – http://www.editpadpro.com/
    • This is a very versatile and free text editing software we will use for editing PhP documents.
    • By no means is this particular program required, but I text editor slightly more advanced than Notepad will make your life easier.
  3. Filezilla – http://filezilla-project.org/
    • This is a free FTP program that we will use to upload all of our files to a web server.
    • Like EditPad Pro, you do not need this particular program, but it is quite good and the one I will use.

Introductory Resources

  1. Flash Introduction (University of Kansas ) – http://www.techdocs.ku.edu/docs/flash_mx2004_introduction.pdf
    • This is a very nice introduction to the basics of Flash done by the Academic Computing Services of the University of Kansas.
    • This document uses Flash MX 2004, but the basics are all the same as CS3.
    • Feel free to ignore everything related to animation (e.g. Tweening) as it is not relevant for this workshop.
  2. Total Training Videos – http://www.totaltraining.com/prod/adobe/flashpro8.asp
    • Total Training is a teaching product that has instructional videos for a lot of computer related products.
    • I don’t suggest that you go out and buy the Flash videos, but they do provide quite a few of the introductory ones for free. Just go to the above link and click on “Free Tutorials.”
    • Follow the instructions and you’ll be taken to the videos. I suggest going through as much as you can in the courses “Flash Professional 8” and “Flash Professional 8 – Actionscript,” You can check out the Flash CS3 tutorials too, but I suspect they will be redundant.

Important Files

  1. Workshop Files for Session 1 (and part of 2) – http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~jgalak/workshopfiles/workshopfiles.zip
    • The above is a zip file containing 9 files that you’ll need. They are:
      1. workshopfiles.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 and is what I will be using.
      2. workshopfiles_FLASH8.fla: This is the same file as above but compatible with Flash 8 and newer. I’m guessing that many of you will use this version. It has the exact same structure and code, so don’t worry about the compatibility issues.
      3. workshopfiles.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      4. workshopfiles.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      5. workshopfiles.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      6. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      7. workshopfilesdebrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      8. jeff.jpg: An image used in the progrm
      9. leff.jpg: Another image.
    • You can see what the final version looks like here: http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~jgalak/workshopfiles/workshopfiles.php
  2. Workshop Files for Session 3 – http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~jgalak/workshopfiles2/workshopfiles2.zip
    • The above is a zip file containing 9 files that you’ll need for Session 3. They are:
      1. workshopfiles2.fla: This is the file you open in Flash to edit. It is formatted to work ONLY with Flash CS3 and is what I will be using.
      2. workshopfiles2_FLASH8.fla: This is the same file as above but compatible with Flash 8 and newer. I’m guessing that many of you will use this version. It has the exact same structure and code, so don’t worry about the compatibility issues.
      3. workshopfiles2.swf: This is the compiled version of the program that you would upload to your web server.
      4. workshopfiles2.txt: This is a text file that you can ignore. It simply keeps track of the conditions (more on this in the workshop).
      5. workshopfiles2.php: This is the php script that opens the program on the server and assigns conditions.
      6. parseflash.php: This is the code that handles all the data processing.
      7. workshopfiles2debrief.php: This is the file where you include your debriefing. Edit it with EditPad Pro.
      8. forthebirds.flv: Video file for the program.
      9. lifted.flv: Another video file for the program.
  3. Powerpoint for Session 1 – http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~jgalak/flashworkshop/FlashWorkshop-Session1.ppt
  4. Powerpoint for Session 2 – http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~jgalak/flashworkshop/FlashWorkshop-Session 2.ppt
  5. Powerpoint for Session 3 – http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~jgalak/flashworkshop/FlashWorkshop-Session3.ppt
  6. Experiment Check List – http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~jgalak/flashworkshop/ExperimentCheckList.pdf

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at jgalak@stern.nyu.edu